6-year-old made $11 million in one year reviewing toys on YouTube

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For kids today, who were born after the internet revolution and social media craze, their biggest stars are not so much of actors but YouTube celebrities and social media stars.  

The likes of DJ Khaled and Beyonce are cashing in big on their kids by making them social media influencers at the age where they can barely even speak.   It is a common phenomenon now to see kids with their own YouTube channels speaking about things they love and making some money as well. 

And one of the biggest of them all is a 6-year-old named Ryan who plays with toys — mesmerizing millions of children across the globe.

Since he was 3 years old, Ryan’s parents have been capturing videos of him opening toys, playing with them and “reviewing” them for videos posted on their YouTube channel, “Ryan ToysReview.”

Ryan’s last name and his place of residence are a closely guarded secret, and not without reason.

Ryan has become a multi-millionaire, according to Forbes magazine’s just-out list of highest paid YouTube entrepreneurs. He was ranked number eight, having brought in $11 million in revenue between June 1, 2016, and June 1, 2017, before management fees and taxes, of course. He tied with the comedy channel Smosh, created by Anthony Padilla and Ian Hecox.

 

Children everywhere have become hooked, watching his videos for hours a day, even mimicking him and starting their own YouTube channels. For some of his youngest fans, Ryan is not just some stranger on the Internet. He is their friend.

Combined, the world’s 10 highest-paid YouTube stars earned $127 million, up 80 percent from last year. According to Forbes, this boost came thanks to ad dollars from a surge in views — including a healthy sum from “Ryan ToysReview.”

What has grown into a viral phenomenon began with a simple, unremarkable 15-minute video about a Lego Duplo train set. When his family started recording and posting the videos in March 2015, the 3-year-old barely had any views let alone reviews, according to a profile of Ryan in Verge. In his first video, he simply opened a Lego box, set up the blocks, and played with them.

“Ryan was watching a lot of toy review channels — some of his favorites are EvanTubeHD and Hulyan Maya — because they used to make a lot of videos about Thomas the Tank Engine, and Ryan was super into Thomas,” his mother, who declined to be named, told TubeFilter last year.

“One day, he asked me, ‘How come I’m not on YouTube when all the other kids are?’ So we just decided — yeah, we can do that. Then, we took him to the store to get his very first toy — I think it was a Lego train set — and it all started from there.”

Soon the boy started playing with not just one toy at a time, but two, and then dozens. About four months in, his channel saw an explosion of traffic, driven primarily by a viral video of Ryan reviewing a hundred toys at once. It is titled “100+ cars toys GIANT EGG SURPRISE OPENING Disney Pixar Lightning McQueen kids video Ryan ToysReview”

“Ryan ToysReview” took off. Views started doubling every month. In January of 2016, he hit 1 million subscribers. A year later, he had more than 5 million. Now, he’s at more than 10 million subscribers.

In June, TubeFilter ranked “Ryan ToysReview” as the most viewed YouTube channel in the U.S. for the 40th week in a row. In September, NBA player Kevin Durant was featured in one of Ryan’s videos performing a children’s science experiment.

Each time someone clicks on one of Ryan’s videos, his family makes money. There are ads and links to ads all over the place. Ryan has real impact.

“If a product gets 10 million, 20 millions views, and you see that Ryan loves it, or other kids love it, it has a huge impact at retail,” Jim Silver, CEO of the review site Toys, Tots, Pets, and More, told the Verge when Ryan was still 5 years old. “He’s really the youngest success that we’ve seen. Most of the time the kids were in the 6-plus range, just because of the vocabulary and the maturity to do a review.”

His parents told TubeFilter in September of last year that 99 percent of the channel’s videos aren’t branded. At the time, the parents said they paid for all of the toys that Ryan reviewed. It’s unclear how many toys he reviews are sent to him by sponsors, but his video descriptions often include dozens of links to name-brand items. According to his channel’s “about” page, the family donates most of the toys to charity after Ryan reviews them.

Source: The Washington Post

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